As you read this I should hopefully be ploughing my way across the Drake Passage with no internet access, so some final thoughts before I go. A few big blows have broken up a lot of the ice that was starting to form a thick layer, which gives nice views when the sun pays a visit, though Hero Inlet adjacent to the base is solid with its winter coat of snow there to stay.

Sunrise over the bay
Sunrise over the bay

 

One of the most important people on base is the cook; such a small community cannot afford discontent based on bad food.

Mike's 'mazing cake
Mike’s ‘mazing cake

 

In addition to morale, he also plays an important role in maintaining good health. The heroic age of Antarctic exploration was dogged by poor nutrition, though with ready access to frozen food and delivery of ‘freshies’ every 6-8 weeks that is not a problem here. Nevertheless, I have of necessity eaten food well beyond the ‘sell by’ date over the years at different bases, and get very angry at the profit motive that leads to an obscene waste of discarded food as people slavishly adhere to a very conservative ‘best before’ timescale. Treated well, it takes months for fruit to go off, eggs last an age, and someone last night told me how they used to eke out vegetables for the 9 months isolation experienced at South Pole! Some people get obsessed by taking vitamin supplements, but in reality Vitamin D is probably the only one needed (we hide our skin from UV burn in the summer, and frostbite in the winter).

Supplements
Supplements

 

Ever had to plan a family shop for more than a week? Spare a thought for our logistics team that have to cater for a variable ‘family’ of between 24 and 64 for 3-6 months at a time, planning in advance for both variety and sufficient stock in case the boat can’t make a delivery for a while. They also need to take care of supplies for the carpenter, plumber, electrician, boatman, electrician etc. And at this time of year they have the additional responsibility for ensuring everyone’s luggage gets here/leaves on time – quite a task!

Logistics at work
Logistics at work

 

Entertainment on base is of course home-grown. The day starts with most people glued to the NY Times news summary, but more importantly the crossword (which keeps many going until evening). The base band practices regularly, and has a number of talented musicians: Harry (carpenter) on lead guitar, Kris (waste management) on bass guitar and sax, Adina (electronics tech) on fiddle, keyboards and vocals. Bob the base commander holds it together on drums and vocals. The very good farewell jam session was much appreciated.

The band
The band

 

And that’s it – cargo and samples are packed away, now its time to catch up on lost sleep and think about how we’re going to process the huge amount of data we’ve accumulated over an intense 3 months of experiments. It was exhausting but (I hope!) worthwhile, and certainly enjoyable. I have lots of memories to take back with me, including surprise visitors (see http://youtu.be/EnD9rJ-A95M – this is the view from outside my lab , look out for the Leopard seal popping up for air before diving under the ice) and some stunning sunsets.

Sunset
Sunset
Midwinter Greetings from Palmer Station
Midwinter Greetings from Palmer Station

A long-standing Antarctic tradition is to celebrate the winter solstice with a rest from work on the shortest day, and have a party. Importantly, all the bases send each other greetings, a nice way of maintaining the sense of international cooperation and friendship that the Antarctic Treaty encourages. We even got a letter from the US President (though he doesn’t mention the importance of fish research, I’ll have to have a word about that…).

Letter from the American President
Letter from the American President

 

Another tradition is to jump into the sea (approximately -1.5oC) – the Polar Plunge. While hands get sensitized to cold by constant exposure, the rest of the body becomes more tolerant (not all that tolerant, however; the sea is breathtakingly cold!!) so despite little daylight outdoor work goes on around the base.

Steve on the day time shift
Steve on the daytime shift
Mark laying a new fuel pipe
Mark laying a new fuel pipe

 

This is the last week of experiments, and the final piece of the puzzle is falling into place. We’ve demonstrated cardiac limitations facing the icefish – poor ability to cope with either increased pressure or temperature – now we complement that with investigating vascular limitations. Given the very large heart necessary to pump huge quantities of blood around the body, we reasoned that they rely more on tissue perfusion than diffusion to supply adequate oxygenation (unlike almost all other vertebrates). It follows that their vessel diameter (smooth muscle tone) is probably not as well regulated as other fish – and that is so. They respond to a reduced range of vasoactive substances, and require higher concentrations to elicit a response: they are wired to avoid hypertension and so prevent heart failure when under stress!

The last fishing trip was almost a disaster. Having caught a load of fish in terrible weather, it looked for a long time like our exhausted companions would not be able to land the catch, as bad weather had driven too much ice into the bay for the ship to dock.

No way in for the ship to dock
No way in

 

Fish delivery over ice
Fish delivery over ice

 

There were also people due to leave base, and for a while it looked like the ship would have to head North leaving them behind and releasing our fish on the way! However, the Captain used bow thrusters to spin the boat on its axis and clear some ice, while our boatman used a lot of skill (and patience) to navigate though the local fused pancake ice. A close call!

Winter is definitely on us now, with breaks between storms bringing surprisingly calm periods where sea freezing is increasing at an alarming rate. First the water appears to have a sheen (grease ice, a suspension of tiny crystals), which when there is relatively calm water grow into plates (pancake ice) that eventually fuse to complete the winter dressing. For a zodiac-level view see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GrgTGp2Ed8

Pancake ice at dusk
Pancake ice at dusk

 

Most of the research is now completed on base – the ELF station (extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation, travel long distance so we can pick up rainstorm activity in the northern US from here) and monitoring for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty organisation (signature iodine isotope readings on continuously spooled tape) are now fully calibrated and on automatic 24/7 readings; the LTER (long term ecological research network, running since 1990 to follow ecological processes linked to the extent of annual sea ice) has taken the last readings before the ecosystem goes into hibernation. These scientists left on the last northbound shuttle, the ice-strengthened LMG ploughing its way out of the harbour before dawn, its powerful headlamps picking out icebergs to be avoided on the way!

Squeezing their way out
Squeezing their way out

 

The final member of our team is Dr Iskander Ismailov (Virginia) who is trying to correlate behavioural changes on acute temperature increases with changes in CNS function. We have shown that fish lose their righting reflex before serious cardiac arrhythmias are evident, suggesting it is a breakdown of neural integration rather than nerve dysfunction that is most temperature sensitive. Iskander is recording from Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, and comparing the response to whole body and local brain warming on discharge frequency.

Iskandar the filmmaker
Iskandar the filmmaker

 

Some have asked about working in the cold, so a quick summary is: use lots of layers of clothing (thermal underwear, thick trousers, thick shirt, fleece jacket, down chest warmer and either windproof or waterproof over-trousers and jacket). Although you may look like the Michelin Man it keeps you warm, but when working you need to be able to lose a layer or two to avoid sweating (frozen sweat is not pleasant). Head cover is of course essential, usually a beanie plus outer cover; there is a style competition going on that Harry the carpenter seems to have won (here wearing his snazzy woollen hat while driving a zodiac).

Harry at the helm
Harry at the helm

 

For the hands, waterproof or windproof gloves, with liners and an inner thin glove is helpful. This is impractical when working with instruments, so for experiments I wear fingerless gloves (cycling gloves are great) using chemical hand warmers held in pockets when the fingers go numb. For surgery there is no option than bare hands (surgeons gloves get shredded by teeth and spines on these animals), and no avoiding the pain of working in ice-cold water. You need to organise procedures in bouts, allowing periods to warm hands and get fingers moving again. The helpfully provided warm air driers are not a good idea – concentrates the saline into all the cuts and gashes that you didn’t know were there – a mistake you only make once!

Hand care
Hand care

 

Other queries:

Q: Where do penguins come from?
A: Although we think of penguins as Antarctic species (and most do live here) they are found off the southern shores of New Zealand, Australia, Africa and South America – up as far as the Galapagos. They developed from early bird ancestors with heavy bones and stumpy wings that are useful for diving, sacrificing the benefit of flight for more efficient swimming.

Q: Why is sea ice so important?
A: For two reasons: it reflects solar radiation and keeps the planet (relatively) cool, and as weather/ocean currents are driven by temperature differences loss of polar ice will (is already) playing havoc with the climate.

On the rare occasion of a clear night we get treated to some lovely views of the southern sky, some strange star formations and beautiful reflections from the moon. A suitably relaxing end to busy days!

Glacier by moonlight
Glacier by moonlight

Everyone likes pictures of penguins, right? So here’s one of an Adelie penguin (the most southerly breeding bird) taking a stroll over the snow. Quite a comical waddle.

An Adelie Penguin taking a stroll
An Adelie Penguin taking a stroll

 

For those who like maps, I include a track of the boat during our last fishing trip (Key: star represents the base, 1 Anvers Is, 2 Neumayer Ch, 3 Wiencke Is, 4 Brabant Is, 5 Dallmann Bay, 6 Gerlache Strait, 7 Andvord Bay) with GPS location superimposed on a montage of satellite images.

Fishing track
Fishing track

 

The data are starting to get really exciting. First, icefish (C. aceratus) hearts fail at an amazingly warm 15oC – this from an animal that would die of heat exhaustion in your fridge at home! Next, the high sensitivity of icefish hearts to resistance against which they have to work (so-called afterload; they can’t maintain cardiac output against just a few cm of water pressure head) is not observed with the rockcod (red-blooded N. coriiceps), which copes with the maximum resistance we can generate in the rig (10X that of icefish, but developed using much smaller hearts) – this presumed sluggish beast is the polar equivalent of a high-performance tuna!

The LMG attempted to dock this week in preparation for the next fishing trip, but had its space at the pier taken up by a number of icebergs that had floated in during a high pressure lull in winds; no way in so they went off to do some survey work and will try again later.

No place to dock
No place to dock

 

The social hour was hosted by the lab manager (Emily) and lab tech (Adina) who decided to offer scientific cocktails – glow in the dark gin & tonic (the ring structure of quinine in tonic water gets excited by UV illumination) – which were a great hit.

Scientific cocktails thanks to Emily and Adina
Scientific cocktails thanks to Emily and Adina

 

Here are some of the more common questions I’ve been asked:

Q: Is it cold?
A: Yes! Though not as cold as other Antarctic bases I’ve worked at, due to a combination of being surrounded by open water and the constant cloud cover, but it’s getting cool now and the wind chill can be vicious.

Q: Are icebergs really blue?
A: Yes! Well, at least the bits that have broken off from older glaciers are (they have been under tremendous pressure so contain less trapped air, therefore have fewer reflective surfaces for light to bounce off, so longer (red or green) wavelengths in the visible spectrum are absorbed).

Q: Do you get ice growing in your beard?
A: Yes! Walking up the glacier or any heavy exertion that causes panting makes your humid breath freeze onto the nearest surface (best to let it melt afterwards, rather than try and snap it off!).

Q: Are there polar bears?
A: No! They’re at the other end of the planet, and never made it this far. They adapted to life in the developing Arctic cold by adopting a carnivorous diet, quickly separating from their close relatives the largely vegetarian brown bear.

Q: How do you pee outside?
A: Quickly! There are strict rules about travelling inland, including bringing all your waste (liquid and solids) back with you. Partly this is to avoid spread of human pathogens, but mainly to limit impact on the environment. Terrestrial and snow/ice ecosystems have often developed relying on wind-borne nutrients, and relieving yourself could add a decade’s worth of nourishment. Along the coast the rules for liquid waste are less strict: there’s plenty of yellow snow around seal beaches, and pink snow around penguin colonies!

Keep the questions coming in!

The project lead, Prof Kristin O’Brien is trying to determine whether mitochondria limit an animal’s thermal tolerance. Mitochondrial respiration rates are being measured from preparations of cardiac and skeletal muscle of notothenioid fishes that differ in haemoglobin and myoglobin expression, held at either ambient temperature, exposed to their critical thermal maximum, or acclimated at 4oC to gain insight into possible consequences of global warming.  Mitochondrial samples will also be shipped to Alaska for identifying oxidised proteins, and quantifying levels of oxidative damage to membrane phospholipids. Hopefully, the physiology results will tie in with these cellular mesurements…

Project Leader Kristin Mitochondria
Project Leader Kristin with her mitochondria

 

The last fishing trip started well in Dallman Bay (named after Eduard Dallmann, leader of the German 1873-74 expedition), with a record catch of icefish in one trawl, but that didn’t last long before bad weather hit; rough seas started to deposit the 2 ton nets on the deck rather than wait for us to winch it safely, so we had to run for shelter in the lee of some islands. We moved onto baited pots to catch the red-blooded coriiceps, but the rough weather had sent fish scurrying for shelter so we caught very few. We then went for a deeper water species and wrecked a net when we caught a load of rocks, one of which took 3 men to dump it overboard, which didn’t do the fish any good at all. I think this is why wise men talk about ‘going fishing’ rather than ‘catching fish’! Ah well, the remaining animals were safely delivered ashore, there is time for one last fishing trip before we wrap up the program, and still plenty to be getting on with.

Fish delivery
Fish delivery – from boat to shore without leaving their tank!

 

Some have asked to see my temporary home, so I have uploaded a video of the base and its surroundings as we were returning from the fishing trip at https://youtu.be/QaKCubO2-eI. The advantage of cutting short the trip was that we returned at dawn through the Neumayer Channel (named after Georg Balthazar von Neumayer, 1826–1909, a German polar explorer who promoted international scientific cooperation) separating Anvers Island from Wiencke Island – one of the most stunning places I’ve ever visited.

The winter weather has started to bite, and days are getting noticeably shorter (sunrise at 11, sunset at 3:30) so the last of the Giant Petrels have now fledged, and left us with just a few seals and Antarctic terns for company. Storms bring other visitors, though, like this impressive iceberg grounded close by.

Stranded iceberg
Stranded iceberg
Giant Petrel fledgling
Giant Petrel fledgling